I resolved to make a cycle frame which would carry the seat without the necessity of having a special seat frame at all. In ordinary "safety" I found the frames were so far from perfection that I had to abandon that system entirely, with the exception of the two tubes running from the bottom bracket to the rear wheel spindle.

1baggaffel

Now, in order to have a strong support in front for the suspension of the seat, and at the same time to hold the top pivot for the front fork, I let one tube from each end of the bottom-bracket tube run to supporting point, where they are joined. Two other tubes run from the supporting to the rear ends of the hind wheel fork, forming two perfect triangles, joined at the top angle; where they carry the seat from the front fork pivot, and are held apart in the two other angles by the bottom-bracket barrel and spindle from the rear-wheel. This is the real body of the frame, and the great strength of it will easily understood.

2frame

To form a strong support behind, from which the seat is suspended to its support in front, I build another tube from each end of the bottom-bracket barrel running to the required point, where they are joined; and from there a wire runs down on either side, where they are connected to the rear ends of the hind wheel fork, forming two other perfect triangles, joined at the top, and held apart beneath in same way as the above-mentioned triangles; the tubes running from the bottom bracket to the hind wheel spindle form the basis of the triangles in both cases.

3saddle

It will be seen that in no other way could equally strong supports for the suspension of the seat be made, unless at the sacrifice of lightness. Nothing like the common front fork could be fixed to this frame. I may say that I never approved of the manner in which these forks were built, in as much as they were weakest where they ought to be strongest, and heaviest where they ought to be lightest.